Agenda & Minutes

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Mayor & Council (View All)

City Council Study Session Agenda & Minutes

Minutes
Thursday, August 23, 2018

AGENDA
August 23, 2018

6:00 p.m.
City Hall, Medford Room
411 W. 8th Street, Medford, Oregon
 
  1. Final Transportation System Plan Review
     
  2. Cooling/warming Shelters

 MINUTES
August 23, 2018

6:00 p.m.
City Hall, Medford Room
411 W. 8th Street, Medford, Oregon

The Medford City Council Study Session was called to order at 6:00 p.m. in the Medford Room of Medford City Hall on the above date with the following members and staff present:
 
Councilmembers Clay Bearnson (arrived at 6:32 p.m.; left at 7:10 p.m.), Kay Brooks, Tim D’Alessandro, Tim Jackle, Kevin Stine, Kim Wallan and Michael Zarosinski
 
Acting City Manager Ryan Martin, City Attorney Lori Cooper, Deputy City Recorder Winnie Shepard, Deputy Public Works Director – City Engineer Alex Georgevitch, Planning Director Matt Brinkley, Principal Planner Carla Paladino
 
Mayor Wheeler and Councilmember Dick Gordon were absent.
 
Transportation System Plan (TSP) Review
Deputy Public Works Director – City Engineer Alex Georgevitch spoke regarding the TSP and noted the following
  • There is a $30 million beginning fund balance of which $16.7 million is obligated to various funds/projects
  • Since 2004, the City has received $42 million (an average of $3 million per year) from state and federal grants
    • Grant funding scenarios include options with $700,000 per year, the historical $3 million per year and an alternative option of $1.5 million per year
  • Using House Bill 2017 Gas tax increase for maintenance removes $36,581,000 for capital projects from the 20-year projection
  • ADA replacements have increased City’s maintenance cost
    • The city spent $800,000 this year and estimates $900,000 for next year for ADA improvements; anticipates costs to increase at least 3% per year for the next 20-years
  • HB2017 funds and$700,000 in grant funding were assumed in the base funding 20-year funding scenario
  • Outlined the 6 scenarios.All scenarios include maintaining LOS D city-wide with LOS E at the two identified intersections and the remaining 17-project list
    • Scenario 1
      • $15 million for Foothill, North Phoenix and South Stage mega-corridor
      • $200/$100k annually for sidewalks and bike improvements, respectively
      • 2 segments of Larson Creek Greenway
      • 15 street improvement projects
      • 6 intersection projects (non LOS)
    • Scenario 2 includes HB2017 funds
      • $15 million for Foothill, North Phoenix and South Stage mega-corridor
      • $70/$35k annually for sidewalks and bike improvements, respectively
      • 7 street improvement projects
      • 2 intersection projects (non LOS)
    • Scenario 3
      • $20 million for Foothill/North Phoenix and South Stage mega corridor
      • $400/$200k annually for sidewalks and bike improvements, respectively
      • 2 segments of Larson Creek Greenway
      • 25 street improvement projects
      • 12 intersection projects (non LOS)
    • Scenario 4
      • $15 million for Foothill, North Phoenix and South Stage mega-corridor
      • $300/$100k annually for sidewalks and bike improvements, respectively
      • 2 segments of Larson Creek Greenway
      • 18 street improvement projects
      • 6 intersection projects (non LOS)
    • Scenario 5
      • $15 million for Foothill, North Phoenix and South Stage mega-corridor
      • $250/$100k annually for sidewalks and bike improvements, respectively
      • 2 segments of Larson Creek Greenway
      • 20 street improvement projects
      • 6 intersection projects (non LOS)
    • Scenario 6
      • $15 million for Foothill, North Phoenix and South Stage mega-corridor
      • $200/$100k annually for sidewalks and bike improvements, respectively
      • 2 segments of Larson Creek Greenway
      • 11 street improvement projects
      • 4 intersection projects (non LOS)
    • Future funding from gas tax and HB2017 is not guaranteed; HB2017 funding forecast was provided by the League of Oregon Cities
    • Staff to determine if any HB2017 funds are capped
    • Future amendments would require a Comprehensive Plan amendment and changes reported to the MPO
    • Although scenarios are 20-year projections, the project list will be reviewed by the Transportation Commission and potentially updated every two years using the Capital Improvement Plan and the project list
    • General consensus was Scenario 5, with the knowledge that there will be a funding shortage
    • Councilmember Jackle recommended a public hearing and all options should be part of the public record
      • Planning Director Matt Brinkley advised that there is another public input meeting, but not a public hearing
    • UGB annexations cannot be processed without a finalized TSP
 
Principal Planner Carla Paladino advised that after the scenario was determined, final edits would be made, then a review by the Planning Commission, another public outreach meeting, followed by review by committees before returning to the Planning Commission and then to the City Council.
 
Council’s consensus was Scenario 5, but would like the other versions considered as well.  Updates could be provided through the City Manager reports.
 
Cooling/Warming Shelters
Planner II Kyle Kearns advised that staff was seeking direction before the public hearing scheduled for September 20 and outlined the following:  
  • Staff received feedback from the non-profit sector, which requested less onerous standards for smaller shelters
  • New temporary shelter classification for 15 or fewer clients
    • Would adhere to special standards, including an operations plan
    • Obtain a Temporary Shelter Operational Permit
    • Waive parking standards
    • In residential zones temporary shelters would be required to be an accessory use to institutional uses
    • Would be similar to residential care, residential training and residential treatment facilities
    • Would require an operational permit and not a conditional use permit
  • All temporary shelters require an operations plan that includes
    • Safety and security provisions
    • Dates of operational period
    • Additional requirements may be added City departments for safety
    • Client interactions
    • Rules for shelter use
    • Facility operations and maintenance
  • The permitting process for a conditional use would take three to four months
  • An additional change is that temporary shelters shall not exceed 90 days within a nine-month period, rather than 12 months
  • The exceptions for temporary shelters of 15 or fewer
    • Would not require a 500 foot buffer from other shelters
    • Have one on-duty representative
    • No required fire watch
 
It was noted that the Planning Commission met and recommended approval.  The Commission also approved future revisions requested by non-profits during a listening session.  The Planning Commission did not discuss the proposed revisions made by the non-profits.
 
Council discussed whether to require neighborhood input regardless of the number of residents in a temporary shelter. 
 
Council President Michael Zarosinski advised that Council would like to know what was actually approved by the Planning Commission and the requests made by the nonprofits after the Planning Commission’s approval.  Council would start with the recommendation and move on from there.
 
The meeting adjourned at 7:18 p.m.
 
 
 
 
Winnie Shepard
Deputy City Recorder
 
 
                       
 

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